Tag Archives: British Expeditionary Force

Accounting and medicine: British Army medical units and shell shock during the First World War

Miley, F. M., & Read, A. F. (2016). Accounting and medicine: British Army medical units and shell shock during the First World War. Paper presented at the 14th World Congress of Accounting Historians, Pescara.

Abstract: This research enhances our understanding of the role of accounting in creating and enforcing stigma. We examine the accounting practices of British Army medical units during the First World War, focusing on forward medical units which were located immediately behind a battle area to provide the first place for medical evacuation and treatment outside a fighting zone. Inflexible and inappropriate accounting processes placed an onerous burden on these units, causing medical and management difficulties which had a direct impact on the classification, triaging and treatment of men requiring medical attention. While disadvantaging all men requiring medical treatment, the accounting issues surrounding forward line medical units proved particularly problematic for men with shell shock, contributing to their stigmatisation. Our research suggests that stigma can be the unintended consequence of an accounting system.

Full paper available through Andrew Read’s ResearchGate page
Advertisements

“Broken and mad”: Accounting, shell shock and the British Army medical unit 1914-18

Miley, F. M., & Read, A. F. (2015). “Broken and mad”: Accounting, shell shock and the British Army medical unit 1914-18. Paper presented at the 20th Conference on the History of Management and Organisations Lille, France.

Abstract – English

The purpose of this research is to enhance our understanding of the role of accounting in supporting stigma. We use the example of medical management of men with shell shock in British Army casualty clearing hospitals during the First World War. These men were stigmatised by other soldiers and the British Army because of their medical condition. Accounting processes that contributed to the stigmatisation of shell shocked men included initial classification of their medical condition, rigid mechanisms for determining re-supply quantities to casualty clearing hospitals and the additional accounting burden created for medical units when dealing with men with shell shock. Although stigmatisation of soldiers with shell shock was not due to accounting for the medical management of the condition, our analysis indicates that accounting practices in Royal Army Medical Corps casualty clearing stations supported and may have exacerbated the stigmatisation of the shell shocked and may have delayed recovery from shell shock.

Abstract – French

Cette recherche approfondit notre compréhension de la relation entre la comptabilité et la stigmatisation. Nous étudions les hôpitaux militaires britanniques pendant la première guerre mondiale. En particulier, nous étudions la stigmatisation des soldats britanniques en état de commotion. Les processus de la comptabilité militaire ont contribué à leur stigmatisation. Nous concluons que les processus de la comptabilité ont été un facteur important dans l’allongement de la durée de rétablissement des hommes en état de commotion.

Link to paper

Cartoons as alternative accounting: front-line supply in the First World War

AHR coverMiley, F. M., & Read, A. F. (2014). Cartoons as alternative accounting: front-line supply in the First World War. Accounting History Review, 24(2-3), 161-189. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21552851.2014.967932

Abstract

The accounting system that supported the provision of supplies to the Western Front during the First World War had some inadequacies from the perspective of the soldier on the front line. These inadequacies are revealed through the cartoons drawn by Bruce Bairnsfather, a front-line officer in the British Army. Our examination shows that cartoons can provide source material for accounting histories. It also shows that cartoons can be considered as a form of accounting themselves and, in doing so, stretches the epistemological boundaries of accounting.

Link to journal