Accounting lessons from a medieval woman: The writing of Christine de Pisan

Miley, F.M. & Read, A.F. (2016). Accounting lessons from a medieval woman: The writing of Christine de Pisan. Paper presented at the 39th European Accounting Association Annual Congress, Maastricht.

Abstract: Extant research in accounting history has viewed double-entry bookkeeping as a development of single-entry bookkeeping, also known as charge and discharge accounting, that was either prompted by the rise of mercantilism or capitalism. This has led to historical research in accounting that seeks to uncover early examples of the purposes ascribed to double-entry booking in examples of early financial accounts were prepared using single-entry bookkeeping. This research seeks to enhance our understanding of accounting by using the writing of Christine de Pisan, a medieval Italian-French writer, on the nature and purpose of single-entry bookkeeping to demonstrate that single-entry bookkeeping is not a simpler or earlier version of double-entry bookkeeping but a separate approach to bookkeeping which should be considered in its own right. We turn to philosophy of science and draw an analogy using Lakatos’ methodology of scientific research programmes to understand why single-entry and double-entry bookkeeping co-existed for many centuries and why double-entry bookkeeping became dominant.

Full paper available through Andrew Read’s ResearchGate page

Spies, debt and the well-spent penny: accounting and the Lisle agricultural estates 1533–1540

Miley, F.M. & Read, A.F (2016). Spies, debt and the well-spent penny: accounting and the Lisle agricultural estates 1533–1540. Accounting History Review, 26(2), 83-105. doi: 10.1080/21552851.2016.1187638.

Abstract: The Lisle family was one of the wealthiest families in England during the early Tudor period. Its wealth came primarily from agricultural estates. This research examines the family’s accounting during the period 1533–1540. We examine the family’s use of correspondence to an extensive network of spies, called privy friends, to secure allegiances, obtain information and help the family increase its agricultural landholdings. We also examine the use of correspondence to facilitate cash flow through strategies to manage indebtedness. While the family’s agricultural holdings ensured its continuing wealth, the management of indebtedness, gifts and payments to privy friends were important for wealth accumulation. The strategies used by the Lisle family were responses to a turbulent, uncertain and ever-shifting political environment. We conclude that Tudor manorial estate accounting systems included both financial accounts and correspondence and that both must be considered when analysing the role of accounting information in single-entry accounting systems.

Full paper available from Accounting History Review.

The purgatorial shadows of war: Accounting, blame and shell shock pensions 1914-23

Miley, F.M. & Read, A.F. (2015). The purgatorial shadows of war: Accounting, blame and shell shock pensions 1914-23. Paper presented at eighth Accounting History International Conference, Ballarat.

Abstract: This research is a qualitative analysis of the role of accounting in British disablement pensions awarded to men who sustained shell shock during their Army service in the First World War. It suggests that accounting classification of shell shock for pension determination purposes supported a view of shell shock which made men with shell shock scapegoats of a system that was often unsupportive. Accounting classification contributed to the lack of support by distancing pension decision-makers from the moral consequences of pension determinations. This was able to occur because the British government used accounting classification as part of a mechanism to avoid blame for its pension determination choices. This research contributes to an ongoing debate about the role of government by suggesting that the functions of government provide opportunities for accounting to simultaneously serve a neutral role as mere inscription while being a social and moral construct.

Paper available through Andrew Read’s ResearchGate page.

Talkin’ about my generation : Accounting and pirate radio

Miley, F.M & Read, A.F. (2015), Talkin’ about my generation : Accounting and pirate radio, Paper presented at the eighth Accounting History International Conference, Ballarat.

Abstract: In the 1960s, the British Broadcasting Corporation had a monopoly on radio broadcasting in Britain, controlling what was broadcast. This monopoly was maintained through an alliance among the government, the BBC and the Musician’s Union. This monopoly was challenged by pirate radio stations operating outside British territorial limits. This research examines the use of financial controls by the British Government to suppress the largest pirate radio station, Radio Caroline. Radio Caroline subverted the BBC monopoly through playing rock music and making money through advertising. The government implemented financial control mechanisms that ensured Radio Caroline could not operate profitably. While these controls led to the demise of Radio Caroline, they failed to suppress rock music or the youth culture it represented. Examining the role of accounting and financial control in the suppression of Radio Caroline illustrates how private sector accounting can provide a mechanism for government blame avoidance.

Full paper available through Andrew Read’s ResearchGate page

Advertising the accountant: A stereotype in crisis.

scoverijcaMiley, F. M., & Read, A. F. (2014). Advertising the accountant: A stereotype in crisis. International Journal of Critical Accounting, 6(5/6), 423-440. doi: 10.1504/IJCA.2014.068373

Abstract

Although we now recognise celebrity in such diverse areas as the celebrity trainer, celebrity chef and celebrity gardener, we are yet to see the rise of the celebrity accountant. Previous research has described the accounting image as dull and boring yet recruitment advertising by the accounting profession presents a very different image. This research tries to understand that apparent inconsistency by examining the role of stereotypes in commedia dell’arte, a form of improvisational theatre that developed in 15th century Italy and which used stock characters based on the common stereotypes of the day. In this research il dottore, one of the stock characters of commedia dell’arte, is considered to show how stereotypes provide encoded information that can serve an important purpose. In addition, we contend that if the recruitment advertising by the accounting profession is successful in changing the stereotype of the accountant that has long been entrenched in popular culture, instead of being beneficial to the accounting profession, it would be deleterious. Hence, there is benefit in the accounting profession trying to maintain the stereotype.

Link to journal

Hiding who pays: When disaster relief becomes a disaster

Miley, F. M., & Read, A. F. (2015). Hiding who pays: When disaster relief becomes a disaster. Paper presented at the Asia-Pacific Economic and Business History Conference, Canberra. http://www.acsacs.unsw.adfa.edu.au/news-and-events/apebh2015/

Abstract

Accounting can be a tool of cultural hegemony. In this research we examine the history of the interplay between the New Zealand government and local governments in the management of the recovery from earthquakes. We examine the management of the recovery from two earthquakes, Murchison and Napier, which occurred prior to the introduction of new public management and compare them to the management of the recovery from the recent Christchurch earthquakes. We conclude that accounting arrangements associated with the introduction of new public management permit the shifting of costs of earthquake recovery from the national government to local government while simultaneously hiding the hegemonic control the national government has over local government.

Link to paper

“Broken and mad”: Accounting, shell shock and the British Army medical unit 1914-18

Miley, F. M., & Read, A. F. (2015). “Broken and mad”: Accounting, shell shock and the British Army medical unit 1914-18. Paper presented at the 20th Conference on the History of Management and Organisations Lille, France.

Abstract – English

The purpose of this research is to enhance our understanding of the role of accounting in supporting stigma. We use the example of medical management of men with shell shock in British Army casualty clearing hospitals during the First World War. These men were stigmatised by other soldiers and the British Army because of their medical condition. Accounting processes that contributed to the stigmatisation of shell shocked men included initial classification of their medical condition, rigid mechanisms for determining re-supply quantities to casualty clearing hospitals and the additional accounting burden created for medical units when dealing with men with shell shock. Although stigmatisation of soldiers with shell shock was not due to accounting for the medical management of the condition, our analysis indicates that accounting practices in Royal Army Medical Corps casualty clearing stations supported and may have exacerbated the stigmatisation of the shell shocked and may have delayed recovery from shell shock.

Abstract – French

Cette recherche approfondit notre compréhension de la relation entre la comptabilité et la stigmatisation. Nous étudions les hôpitaux militaires britanniques pendant la première guerre mondiale. En particulier, nous étudions la stigmatisation des soldats britanniques en état de commotion. Les processus de la comptabilité militaire ont contribué à leur stigmatisation. Nous concluons que les processus de la comptabilité ont été un facteur important dans l’allongement de la durée de rétablissement des hommes en état de commotion.

Link to paper

Cartoons as alternative accounting: front-line supply in the First World War

AHR coverMiley, F. M., & Read, A. F. (2014). Cartoons as alternative accounting: front-line supply in the First World War. Accounting History Review, 24(2-3), 161-189. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21552851.2014.967932

Abstract

The accounting system that supported the provision of supplies to the Western Front during the First World War had some inadequacies from the perspective of the soldier on the front line. These inadequacies are revealed through the cartoons drawn by Bruce Bairnsfather, a front-line officer in the British Army. Our examination shows that cartoons can provide source material for accounting histories. It also shows that cartoons can be considered as a form of accounting themselves and, in doing so, stretches the epistemological boundaries of accounting.

Link to journal

Making accounting interesting: Achieving the impossible through storytelling?

Lenses of LearningMiley, F. M., & Read, A. F. (2013). Making accounting interesting: Achieving the impossible through storytelling? In Flood, A. & Coleman, K. S. (Eds.), Disciplines: The Lenses of Learning (pp. 111-122). Champaign, Illinois: Common Ground Publishing LLC.

Abstract

This research examines the use of creative student-led story presentations to overcome negative perceptions about accounting. It compares two groups of students: one group is enrolled in an accounting degree and the other group is studying a single course of accounting in a non-accounting degree program. While the non-accounting students responded positively and their perception of accounting was enhanced, there was little change in the attitude to accounting of the group enrolled in an accounting degree. Reflections on the results, the different responses of the two groups and the potential of creative storytelling approaches in university teaching conclude this chapter.

Link to publisher

YouTube video on jokes in popular culture

YouTube_logo_standard_whiteLast year we posted details of our article:  Jokes in popular culture: The characterisation of the accountant. We have recently created a YouTube video which highlights some of the issues included in our research.  The URL of the video is: http://youtu.be/oxxC9gMDJew

We hope you enjoy the video and appreciate an alternative conduit to our research.